Fusion of mobile phone sensing and sensors in the enviroment

The availability of a wide range of sensing technologies in our everyday environment presents an opportunity to enrich mobile sensing applications with fine-grained real-world sensing. The fusion of both mobile and sensing in the environment offers opportunities to achieve better accuracy for people-centric applications, as well as new strategies for reducing energy consumption on mobile devices. However, the introduction of passive sensing into people-centric sensing applications disrupts the traditional, user-initiated input to sensing services, raising both privacy and acceptability concerns.

Current Work

Fusion of mobile phone sensing and sensors in the enviroment

The availability of a wide range of sensing technologies in our everyday environment presents an opportunity to enrich mobile sensing applications with fine-grained real-world sensing. The fusion of both mobile and sensing in the environment offers opportunities to achieve better accuracy for people-centric applications, as well as new strategies for reducing energy consumption on mobile devices. However, the introduction of passive sensing into people-centric sensing applications disrupts the traditional, user-initiated input to sensing services, raising both privacy and acceptability concerns.

Social interactions in the workplace

In many work environments, serendipitous interactions between members of different groups may lead to enhanced productivity, collaboration and knowledge dissemination. In this work the aim is to explore the use of wireless sensing technologies to capture social interaction in workplaces. Further analysis of the real social network of face-to-face interactions can reveal new insights on how social ties are created in a working environment, and how teams and individuals can collaborate and influence each other.

Wireless Sensing in Construction

Exploring the technical challenges of building wireless sensor networks for structural monitoring. The aim is to desing a reliable system for wireless sensing, reliying on the use of open standards such as 6LoWPAN that can facilitate interoperability and integration of a diverce range of sensing devices. Current work involves the deployment of a 6LoWPAN based sensor network in an old Post-Office tunnel in London, monitoring the displacement of the rings of metal that constitute the tunnel.

FRESNEL: Federated Secure Sensor Network Laboratory

With FRESNEL we aim to build a large scale federated sensor network framework with multiple applications sharing the same resources. We want to guarantee a reliable intra-application communication as well as a scalable and distributed management infrastructure. Orthogonally, privacy and application security should also be maintained.

Past Projects

NEMO: Networked Embedded Models and Memories of Physical Work Activity

The NEMO project is an EPSRC-funded collaborative effort by the Departments of Computing, Management Science and Psychology at Lancaster University aimed at the inter-disciplinary investigation of ubiquitous computing technologies and embedded wireless systems for industrial workplaces. The focal point of the project is the development and use of 'smart artefacts', i.e. work-related objects such as tools and containers augmented with embedded computing, sensing and wireless communication capabilities.

e-Campus: A Research Network of Public Displays

The Lancaster University e-Campus project is developing a campus wide infrastructure of public displays designed to enhance campus life and to provide a research infrastructure for new applications on public networked displays. To date they have deployed over 50 displays ranging from small 'door plate' displays, through 40inch LCD panels up to 40foot wall displays on highly visible locations throughout the campus of the Lancaster University. Each display is equipped with at least one Bluetooth scanner and can be modified to support multiple sensing devices such as cameras or microphones. The system provides a software platform, which enables content creators to develop own applications and experiments.

GUIDE: Context-Aware Electronic Tourist Guide

The GUIDE project is developing hand-held computer based tourist GUIDEs for visitors to Lancaster. These GUIDEs are context-sensitive. In other words, they have knowledge of their physical location and their user's preferences. They can use this knowledge to display information and perform services specific to both a user and a location. For example, if a user is interested in history, the GUIDE unit is able to construct a walking tour which takes account of this interest. The unit gives the user directions on how to get from one location to the next. As the user arrives at each destination the unit describes what is being seen from a historical perspective.

Interfaces & Infrastructure for Mobile Multimedia Applications

Mobile environments are characterized by frequent and sudden changes in both context and resource availability. While existing systems have focused on supporting adaptation to changes in resource constraints or contextual-awareness, in this project we focused on obtaining insights into the design and implementation of an infrastructure platform that would handle both types of variation with equal ease. Within this design adaptation mechanisms and policies are decoupled and, furthermore, mechanisms can be exposed and externalised in order to enable control by independent entities. The main aim of this approach is to enable the coordination of the behaviour of applications according to user defined policies.